jump to navigation

You can’t even rely on the shadowy puppetmasters any more February 26, 2008

Posted by Jeff in "Reality has a well-known liberal bias", Weirdness.
add a comment

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Not like in the good old days …

If every Obama supporter was this smart and passionate … February 18, 2008

Posted by Jeff in "Reality has a well-known liberal bias".
1 comment so far

… I would be a lot more enthusiastic about him …



(more…)

Happy Valentine’s Day, from Eleanor February 14, 2008

Posted by Jeff in French, Opera, Theater.
1 comment so far

Eleanor Steber, that is, singing “Depuis le jour” from Gustave Charpentier’s Louise.

The (possibly apocryphal) story is that she recorded this for HMV because she was too hung over to sing the Mozart arias she had been hired to perform.

An non-break from not blogging February 11, 2008

Posted by Jeff in News about the non-blog.
1 comment so far

Back in the summer of 2006, my friend Bob was so scornful of bloggers, that to avoid his snark I told him the only reason I was setting up a … well, a non-blog … was to promote my writing projects.

By my calculation, this is my six hundredth non-post on my non-blog, representing at least one post per day pretty much without fail since I started.

(more…)

“Chattanooga Choo Choo” February 10, 2008

Posted by Jeff in 1929 through WWII, Dance, Jazz, Movies, Music, Nicholas Brothers, Swing.
add a comment

From Sun Valley Serenade (1941), an intro by the Glenn Miller Orchestra segues into …


(more…)

“I Got A Gal In Kalamazoo” February 9, 2008

Posted by Jeff in 1929 through WWII, Dance, Jazz, Movies, Music, Nicholas Brothers, Swing.
add a comment

A year after Sun Valley Serenade, Glenn Miller, the Nicholas Brothers and Harry Warren and Max Gordon continue their survey of songs about American cities with funny names …

(more…)

“Lucky Numbers” February 8, 2008

Posted by Jeff in 1929 through WWII, Dance, Jazz, Movies, Music, Nicholas Brothers, Swing.
1 comment so far

From The Black Network, a 1936 short, fifteen-year-old Harold and twenty-two-year-old Fayard Nicholas perform “Lucky Numbers” by Cliff Hess.


(more…)

Adelaide Hall and the Nicholas Brothers February 7, 2008

Posted by Jeff in 1929 through WWII, Dance, Movies, Music, Nicholas Brothers, Swing, Theater, Vaudeville.
2 comments

From 1935, the VitaPhone short “An All-Colored Vaudeville Show” …

(more…)

“Alright” February 6, 2008

Posted by Jeff in Cab Calloway, Dance, Music, Nicholas Brothers, R&B.
add a comment

Somebody involved with Janet Jackson’s 1990 music video Alright had a nice sense of cultural history …

(more…)

“Jumpin’ Jive” February 5, 2008

Posted by Jeff in 1929 through WWII, Cab Calloway, Dance, Jazz, Movies, Music, Nicholas Brothers, Swing.
add a comment

This clip from Stormy Weather (1943) features Calloway and his orchestra, and the amazing Nicholas Brothers (Harold and Fayard).


(more…)

“Au fond du temple saint” February 4, 2008

Posted by Jeff in French, Opera, Theater.
add a comment

From the 1996 Met tribute to James Levine, tenor Roberto Alagna and baritone Bryn Terfel, conducted by Levine.

(more…)

Forgotten Broadway classics: Brigadoon February 3, 2008

Posted by Jeff in Musicals, Theater.
add a comment

Brigadoon album coverMaybe not exactly forgotten, but if all you know of Lerner and Loewe‘s first Broadway hit is the lousy MGM movie or even the disappointing abridged original cast album, check this out.

(more…)

Forgotten Broadway classics: Bloomer Girl February 1, 2008

Posted by Jeff in Harold Arlen, Musicals, Theater.
2 comments

Bloomer Girl album cover

Obviously influenced by the success of Oklahoma!, this 1944 musical featured two of that show’s stars, Celeste Holm and Joan McCracken, and its choreographer Agnes De Mille, in a show with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg, the team best remembered for The Wizard of Oz.
(more…)

Forgotten Broadway classics: Golden Boy January 31, 2008

Posted by Jeff in Musicals, Theater.
add a comment


“Golden Boy” album cover, designed by Saul Bass

A washed-up Pulitzer-Prize-winning playwright gets hired to adapt his most famous work into a musical … thirty years after the original. And he dies before rehearsals have begun.

The star is best known for his Vegas act, and he’s never appeared on Broadway.

The producer will probably be best remembered for this.

The songwriters had a big hit four seasons before — a bubblegum-rock musical.

What a recipe for disaster.

What an unexpected surprise.

(more…)